Feedback Control Systems (block B)

Feedback Control Systems (block B)
1 YEAR II semester  6 CFU
Cristiano M. VERRELLI A.Y. 2021-22
A.Y. 2022-23
Code:
SSD: ING-INF/04

FORMATIVE OBJECTIVES

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

The theory of differential equations is successfully used to gain profound insight into the fundamental mathematical control design techniques for linear and nonlinear dynamical systems.

KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING:

Students should be able to deeply understand (and be able to use) the theory of differential equations and of systems theory, along with related mathematical control techniques.

APPLYING KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING:

Students should be able to design feedback controllers for linear (and even nonlinear) dynamical systems.

MAKING JUDGEMENTS:

Students should be able to identify the specific design scenario and to apply the most suitable techniques. Students should be able to compare the effectiveness of different controls while analyzing theoretical/experimental advantages and drawbacks.

COMMUNICATION SKILLS: Students are expected to be able to read and capture the main results of a technical paper concerning the topics of the course, as well as to effectively communicate in a precise and clear way the content of the course. Tutor-guided individual projects (including Maple and Matlab-Simulink computer simulations as well as visits to labs) invite intensive participation and ideas exchange.

LEARNING SKILLS:

Being enough skilled in the specific field to undertake the following studies characterized by a high degree of autonomy.

SYLLABUS:

The matrix exponential; the variation of constants formula.

Computation of the matrix exponential via eigenvalues and eigenvectors and via residual matrices. Necessary and sufficient conditions for exponential stability: Routh-Hurwitz criterion. Invariant subspaces.

Impulse responses, step responses and steady state responses to sinusoidal inputs. Transient behaviours. Modal analysis: mode excitation by initial conditions and by impulsive inputs; modal observability from output measurements; modes which are both excitable and observable. Popov conditions for modal excitability and observability. Autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models and transfer functions.

Kalman reachability conditions, gramian reachability matrices and the computation of input signals to drive the system between two given states. Kalman observability conditions, gramian observability matrices and the computation of initial conditions given input and output signals. Equivalence between Kalman and Popov conditions.

Kalman decomposition for non-reachable and non-observable systems.

Eigenvalues assignment by state feedback for reachable systems. Design of asymptotic observers and Kalman filters for state estimation of observable systems. Design of dynamic compensators to stabilize any reachable and observable system. Design of regulators to reject disturbances generated by linear exosystems.

Bode plots. Static gain, system gain and high-frequency gain.

Zero-pole cancellation.

STATISTICS:

A.Y.  Mechatronics students Other courses Students Mechatronics average Other courses average
2019/2020 10 62 24 23
2020/2021 19 25 23 24
2021/2022 13 44 21 22

POWER ELECTRONICS AND ELECTRICAL DRIVES

POWER ELECTRONICS AND ELECTRICAL DRIVES
2 YEAR 2 semester 9 CFU
Stefano Bifaretti
A.Y. 2021-22
Stefano Bifaretti (7cfu)

Cristina Terlizzi (2cfu)

A.Y. 2022-23 1st Year I semester
A.Y. 2023-24  (NOT HELD)

A.Y. 2024-25

Code: 8039781
SSD: ING-INF/01

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
The Power Electronics and Electrical Drives course aims to provide a basic understanding of the power semiconductors of the main electronic circuits used for the static conversion of electrical energy as well as the electrical drives. The student will acquire the ability to analyse and perform an initial sizing of power electronic converters operating in either direct or alternating current.

KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING:
The student will be gradually guided to the knowledge of the functional characteristics and behavior of the main static power converters used, in particular, in industrial applications, in Distributed Generation Systems and in power trains of electical vehicles. In order to improve the topics understanding, the use of Matlab-Simulink specific packages for the simulation of electronic power converters is illustrated.

APPLYING KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING:
The knowledge acquired during the course allows the student to select the topology and size of the power converter in relation to the final design.
Different application examples, in particular devoted to distributed energy generation plants, uninterruptible power supplies and electric mobility will allow the student to improve his ability to apply the acquired knowledge.

MAKING JUDGEMENTS:
The student will be able to collect and process specialized technical information on power converters and verify their validity.

COMMUNICATION SKILLS:
The student will be able to relate with power electronics specialists in order to request the technical information necessary for the development of a project activity.

LEARNING SKILLS:
The skills acquired during the course will allow the student to undertake, with a high degree of autonomy, subsequent studies or apply for technical roles in companies working in the field.

 

SYLLABUS:

POWER SEMICONDUCTORS

Power Semiconductors employed in Power Electronics converters: Diodes, BJT, MOSFET, IGBT, Thyristors, Wide Bandgap Semiconductors).

Static and dynamic behavior. Thermal behavior. Conduction and switching losses.

Technical specifications provided by manufacturers’ datasheets. Driving circuits.

POWER CONVERTER TOPOLOGIES

Behavioral characteristics: unidirectional and bidirectional energy transfer, controlled voltage sources. Analysis method of power converters.

DC-DC Converters. Buck, Boost, Buck-Boost. Switching losses reduction. Average Model. Modulation techniques (PWM, PFM, PRM). Output voltage open-loop control. Closed-loop control. Current control.Half and Full Bridge DC-DC converters.

DC-AC Converters (Inverters). Half and Full Bridge DC-AC single-phase converters based on static switches. Three-phase converters. Modulation techniques. Selective Harmonic Elimination (SHE). Sinusoidal Pulse Width Modulation (SPWM).

Rectifiers: Single-phase and three-phase diode rectifiers. Single-phase and three-phase force-commutated PWM rectifiers: topologies, voltage and current controls. Power Factor Corrector (PFC). Effects on grid side of power converters. Generalized power factor. Compliance with grid codes.
Isolated DC-DC converter.

ELECTRICAL DRIVES
Introduction to Electrical Drives. DC, Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors and Induction Motors. DC motors model.

Power Electronics Applications

Power Converters simulation using Matlab-Simulink/Simpowersystem.
Photovoltaic Conversion Systems.
Power trains for electrical vehicles. Battery chargers.

 

ROBOT MECHANICS

ROBOT MECHANICS
1 YEAR (Blocks B|C)
2 YEAR (Blocks A|D|E)
1 semester 9 CFU
Marco Ceccarelli (6/9 cfu)

Matteo Russo (3/6 cfu)

A.Y. 2021-22

A.Y. 2022-23

Matteo Russo A. Y. 2023-24
A.Y. 2024-25
Code: 8039785
SSD: ING-IND/13

LEARNING OUTCOMES: This course will provide students with the knowledge and tools needed to model and analyse robotic manipulators in terms of mechanical performance. Students will learn how to design, evaluate, and control industrial and service robots.

KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING: The student will learn to analyse robotic systems by modelling their kinematics and dynamics and thus finding their key operational parameters. Furthermore, the student will learn how to design a manipulator from its operational requirements, such as workspace, velocity, and payload.

APPLYING KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING: The student will apply this knowledge to design, model, and evaluate robots with examples of use cases. Once identified the joints and bodies that compose a robot, the student will be able to numerically characterize its operation and mobility. Furthermore, the student will be able to critically select a robot type for a given manipulation task.

MAKING JUDGEMENTS: The student will demonstrate their understanding of robot operation by developing and presenting a practical use case, in which they will examine autonomously and critically the challenges behind robot design and application.

COMMUNICATION SKILLS: During the course, students discuss key topics, working on a written project on manipulation analysis of their own choice. Project results are then presented at the end of the course.

LEARNING SKILLS: During the course, students are involved in the lecture for a continuous stimulus to verify their understanding of robot mechanics. The knowledge acquired during the course is also verified in the final project on manipulation analysis.

REQUIREMENTS: The student should have already attended the fundamental courses on calculus, geometry, and physics. The understanding of rigid body mechanics and basic programming skills (MATLAB) are required, as well as knowledge of mechanism design and analysis.

PROGRAMME:

  1. Architecture and classification of industrial and service robots
    1. Definitions: kinematic chains, joints, mobility
    2. Manipulation analysis
    3. Types of manipulators
  2. Kinematics
    1. Reference frames
    2. Denavit-Hartenberg notation
    3. Forward kinematics
    4. Inverse kinematics
    5. Jacobian and singularities
    6. Workspace
    7. Path planning
  3. Statics and dynamics
    1. Equilibrium
    2. Equation of motion
    3. Grasp mechanics
  4. Other designs
    1. Actuation technologies
    2. Parallel robots
    3. Compliant robots
    4. Soft and continuum robots

EXAM:

The exam is divided into a written and oral test. The written test consists of three exercises regarding practical use-cases of industrial and service robots. In alternative, a project report developed during the course can be evaluated. In the oral test, the student will discuss with a critical perspective robot functioning. In alternative, the developed project on manipulation analysis can be presented and discussed.

INTEGRATED SENSORS

INTEGRATED SENSORS
1 YEAR (Block A|C|D|E)
2 YEAR (Block B)
1 semester 9 CFU
Corrado Di Natale A.Y. 2019-20 (new name, ex Electronic Devices and Sensors)
Alexandro Catini (6cfu)
Corrado  Di Natale (3cfu)
A.Y. 2022-23
A.Y. 2023-24
Alexandro Catini (8cfu)
Corrado  Di Natale (1cfu)
A.Y. 2024-25
Code: 8039927
SSD: ING-INF/01

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

To introduce the student to modern sensor technologies and their major applications.

KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING:

To make the student condition to analyze the sensor performance and to design simple sensors’ interface circuit.

APPLYING KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING:

Capability to select sensors for each specific application MAKING JUDGEMENTS:
Evaluate in the different contexts which are the most suitable sensors and evaluate the performance using a standardized parameters set.

COMMUNICATION SKILLS:

Capability to write synthetic reports about the working principles of sensors

LEARNING SKILLS:

To learn how to solve sensors’ circuits to determine their performance and to optimally design sensor systems.

SYLLABUS:

Electronic properties of materials: semiconductors.

General properties of sensors;

Sensitivity and resolution.

Temperature sensors: thermistors, integrated sensors, thermocouples;
Mechanic sensors: Strain gauges: Introduction to MEMS: accelerometer, gyroscope, pressure and flow sensors;

Magnetic sensors;

Optical sensors: photodiodes and image sensors;

infrared sensors; interface circuits for resistive and capacitive sensors

Innovative Materials with Laboratory (blocks B-C-C1-E)

Innovative Materials with Laboratory (blocks B-C-C1-E)
1 YEAR 1 semester 6 CFU
TATA MARIA ELISA (1cfu)
COSTANZA GIROLAMO (1cfu)
VARONE ALESSANDRA (4cfu)
A.Y. 2021-22
A.Y. 2022-23
A.Y. 2023-24 (MS TEAMS)
A.Y. 2024-25 (C1-E)
Code: 8039786
SSD: ING-IND/21

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
The aim of the course is to provide an overview of novel materials recently developed and investigated for applications in mechanics, electronics, and mechatronics. Different types of materials are considered and described with particular attention on the preparation route, specific characteristics, and applications. Some of them are of basic importance for new technologies gaining increasing attention in industrial practice. The knowledge of innovative materials is strictly connected to the possibility and capability of designing new products.

KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING:
Deep knowledge of the metallic structure and their mechanical behavior; in particular knowledge of innovative materials for mechatronics applications; selection of conventional material or not as a function of application, structure and properties.

APPLYING KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING:
Ability to define materials properties and the most suitable production technologies for the components realization; Ability to perform tests in laboratory; Ability to define appropriate treatments in order to obtain the suitable mechanical properties as a function of service conditions. Ability to select innovative materials; ability to evaluate innovative materials properties.

MAKING JUDGEMENTS:
Ability to investigate, select and choose metallic materials as a function of the application.

COMMUNICATION SKILLS:
Clear and correct expression, in English language, skills on the topics covered in the course.

LEARNING SKILLS:

Ability to face a new problem, know how to manage it and find functional and correct solutions. learning ability will be evaluated by exam tests and laboratory activities.

SYLLABUS:

Amorphous alloys: production and applications of metallic glasses as mechatronic devices. Alloys with mixed structure (nanocrystalline and amorphous).

Ultrafine grained (UFG) materials: microstructural features and production routes.

Nanoporous and mesoporous materials: structural characterization and properties. Their applications for energy and gas storage.

Porous materials: metal foams, Open and closed porosity (micro and macro). Classification according to size and shape of the pores.

Properties (sound, energy and vibration absorption, crash behavior) and production methods. Functional and structural applications: lightweight construction, automotive. Metal sandwich structures.

Functional and Smart Materials. Property change as a response of external stimulus: shape memory alloy (one-way and two-way shape memory), thermochromic, photomechanical. Energy conversion:

piezoelectric, thermoelectric. Phase change materials. Applications: mechatronic, energy. Functionally graded materials.

Additive Manufacturing Technologies.

Advanced composite materials: properties, applications, and their production routes.